Lesson Plans for Reading and Writing Workshop - Room 213

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Lesson Plans for Reading and Writing Workshop

Lesson plans and activities for reading workshop and writing workshop. Perfect for middle and high school English classrooms.

I'm excited to share this news with you. I've spent a lot of time this summer doing some detailed lesson planning to blend reading and writing workshop, complete with links to how all of the items in my bundles work together. 



Lesson plans and activities for reading workshop and writing workshop. Perfect for middle and high school English classrooms.

My planning focused on how I would divide up my semester, weeks and days, with a clear focus for each week and class.  I've used a lot of images in the new guide to make it clear which product from each bundle will be used for the unit. 


Lesson plans and activities for reading workshop and writing workshop. Perfect for middle and high school English classrooms.
For example, one week we will be focusing on setting, atmosphere and figurative language. The pages for that week are included in the visuals, and the lesson plans explain how I will use them. There is also a bonus file of links to mentor texts that you can use with your students.


Lesson plans and activities for reading workshop and writing workshop. Perfect for middle and high school English classrooms.

I've also included some more direction for assessment with some editable forms that you can use to meet the needs of your classroom. 


Finally, I added a Speaking & Listening workshop component that will happen at the end of every week. You can read more about that HERE



Lesson plans and activities for reading workshop and writing workshop. Perfect for middle and high school English classrooms.
Currently, I have six weeks planned for my Description and Narration unit; more units will be posted as I finish them! If you have either my Reading Workshop Bundle or Writing Workshop one, it's already there waiting for you to download it. (Check the Teacher Planning File). It's also available in my Reader's Workshop Planner.  While the lessons are designed to link the lessons in each bundle, it should still be very useful to you if you only have one of them. My hope is that it can give teachers a better feel for how to organize workshop in their classroom.


NOTE: This document is meant to give teachers a guide that they can use as they ease into the world of workshop. It’s the “plan” that I intend to use with my own students, but I’ve used quotation marks because it’s a framework only, one that I know will end up being loosely followed. That’s not because I’m a disorganized hot mess, but because if I’m really following the workshop model, many of my lessons will get tweaked as I go, based on the needs of my kids. They may grasp some concepts quickly and I can double up some lessons; they may struggle with other concepts, and I’ll have to slow down and do more. However, I’ve written these plans so I can have a map as I go, knowing full well that I will take detours or more interesting routes. For example, I will quite likely discover new mentor texts as we are reading, and use them to model author moves instead of the ones I had  planned.

What's your biggest obstacle to a successful workshop? Let me know in the comments. Or, join my Facebook group and get feedback from other workshopping teachers.




2 comments

  1. This is absolutely amazing! You have spent so much time creating a clear map for us to follow--thank you. Our hands are somewhat tied in my district as far as curriculum and the workshop model is no longer used, unfortunately. However, I'm hoping I can figure out how to incorporate at least some of these ideas/strategies with my pre-AICE students (with whom I have more freedom). I love all of your products and use many of them.

    I am wondering if, after looking at your unit rubric, if you this is the main grade for your students? I'm constantly looking for ways to streamline my grading and this seems like it may be a solution. It reminds me of some of the college courses I took--the responsibility is on the students more than the teacher. Love it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, hope! The rubric represents their grade for the first six weeks.

    ReplyDelete

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